Scott Collins

Education

Chemistry/Biochemistry (Ph.D., Brigham Young, 1980)

Biosketch

Professor Collins research follows the general trajectory of MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), Nanoscience, electronic materials, and of photonic. fluidic, and electronic components into compact analytical instrumentation. He is currently working on a miniature Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), a microfabricated optical trap for the capture, manipulation and control of biological cells, cell organelles, and dielectric microparticles, and optical waveguide sensors and detection microsystems. Other research interests include the electrochemistry and mechanism of silicon anisotropic etching, fractal phase transitions, mechanism, and applications of porous silicon.

Research Interests

Professor Collins research follows the general trajectory of MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), electronic materials, and of photonic. fluidic, and electronic components into compact analytical instrumentation. He is currently working on a miniature Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), a microfabricated optical trap for the capture, manipulation and control of biological cells, cell organelles, and dielectric microparticles, and optical waveguide sensors and detection microsystems. Other research interests include the electrochemistry and mechanism of silicon anisotropic etching, fractal phase transitions, mechanism, and applications of porous silicon.

Selected Publications

  • 2010 R.L. Smith, C. J. Demers, and S.D. Collins, Microfluidic device for the combinatorial application and maintenance of dynamically imposed diffusional gradients, Journal Microfluidics and Nanofluidics ISSN 1613-4982 (Print) 1613-4990 (Online)

Dissertation Students

Jonathan Bomar